Francis Bok

On May 15, 1986 seven-year old Francis Bok was selling
eggs and peanuts near his village in South Sudan when
Arab militia attacked the marketplace, murdering men
and rounding up women and children. “I saw many
people on the ground, shot…I saw people with their
heads cut off with swords and shot in the head,” Francis
remembers. Strapped to horses Francis and others were
taken to North Sudan and sold into slavery.
For ten years, Bok served his Arab master sleeping with
a cattle and enduring hard labor, constant beatings,
humiliation and forced Islamization. He was given an
Arab name was taunted as “abeed,” a black slave.
After two failed attempts to flee-each bringing severe
beatings and death threats-Francis finally escaped at age seventeen. He was jailed in Khartoum
for seven months and lived in refugee camps in Egypt for three years before the United Nations
granted him a passage to America where he became a modern day abolitionist.
Bok was the first escaped slave to testify before the United States Senate. He met with George
W. Bush, Madeleine Albright, Condoleezza Rice and many other American leaders, educating
them about the plight of modern day slaves. He was honored by the U.S. Olympic Committee
and the Boston Celtics. He spoke alongside Coretta Scott King, widow of Dr. Martin Luther
King, Jr., at the Boston Freedom Award ceremony and headlined a panel discussion on slavery at
Harvard's Kennedy School of Government.
Bok’s autobiography Escape from Slavery: The True Story of My Ten Years in Captivity and My
Journey to Freedom in America, published by St. Martin’s Press, received a wide critical
acclaim. He has been featured in The Boston Globe, The Wall Street Journal, Christian Science
Monitor and many other newspapers. He has appeared on numerous radio and TV shows
including BET, Fox News and CNN.
In 2010 Francis founded the Francis Bok Foundation to raise funds to build a school and a
medical clinic in his hometown of Gor Ayen. He is an Associate of the Boston-based human
rights organization American Anti-Slavery Group and of Kansas-based Sudan Sunrise.
Francis, his wife Atong and his children live in the Boston area.
Mr. Bok is available for speaking and media engagements.
For all inquires contact:
Sasha Giller
American Anti-Slavery Group
This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
617 959On May 15, 1986 seven-year old Francis Bok was sellingeggs and peanuts near his village in South Sudan whenArab militia attacked the marketplace, murdering menand rounding up women and children. “I saw manypeople on the ground, shot…I saw people with theirheads cut off with swords and shot in the head,” Francis remembers. Strapped to horses Francis and others weretaken to North Sudan and sold into slavery.

francisbok_now_jpegFrancis Bok is an escaped Sudanese slave and modern-day abolitionist.  He played an instrumental role in convincing the United States government to push for a peace agreement that stopped Sudan’s civil war (1956 – 2005) and provided for  2011 South Sudan’s referendum on independence.

On May 15, 1986 seven-year old Francis was selling eggs and peanuts near his village in South Sudan when Arab militia stormed the marketplace, slaughtering men and rounding up women and children. Strapped to horses Bok and others were taken to North Sudan and sold into slavery.

For ten years, Bok was a chattel of an Arab master – he slept with animals and endured hard labor, constant beatings, humiliation and forced Islamization. He was given an Arab name and was taunted as “abeed,” a black slave. 

After two failed attempts Francis escaped and came to America as a refugee.

Bok was the first escaped slave to testify before the United States Senate. He met with George W. Bush, Madeleine Albright, Condoleezza Rice and many other American leaders, educating them about the plight of modern day slaves. He was honored by the U.S. Olympic Committee and the Boston Celtics. He spoke alongside Coretta Scott King, widow of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., at the Boston Freedom Award ceremony and headlined a panel discussion on slavery at Harvard's Kennedy School of Government.

Bok’s autobiography Escape from Slavery, published by St. Martin’s Press, received wide critical acclaim. He has been featured in The Boston Globe, The Wall Street Journal, Christian Science Monitor and many other publications. He has appeared on numerous radio and TV shows including BET, Fox News and CNN.

In 2010, Francis founded the Francis Bok Foundation to raise funds to build schools and a medical clinic in his hometown of Gor Ayen. He is an Associate of the Boston-based human rights organization, The American Anti-Slavery Group, and of the Kansas-based non-profit Sudan Sunrise.

Mr. Bok is available for speaking and media engagements.

Topics:

Modern-day slavery
Slavery and genocide in Sudan
South Sudan – the newest African nation
Power of activism

For all inquires contact:  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

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